Image from TERRA
Wed, 23 Jun 2021 14:00 EDT

For tiny airborne-particle pollution, known as PM 2.5, researchers using NASA data found that variability from meteorology obscured the lockdown signals when observed from space.

Image from TERRA
Tue, 01 Jun 2021 14:00 EDT

The 2021 Atlantic hurricane season starts today, June 1. At NASA, we’re developing new technology and missions to study storm formation and impacts, including ways to understand Earth as a system.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 06 May 2021 10:00 EDT

Valley fever is a dangerous threat to human health – and cases are on the rise in the arid southwestern United States, as wind from increasing dust storms can transport the fungal spores that cause the disease. Valley fever is caused by the Coccidioides fungus, which grows in dirt and fields and can cause fever, rash and coughing. Using NASA resear

Thermal mapping of Hawaiian volcanoes with ASTER data

An analysis of data from Terra’s Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument mapped the thermal characteristics of Hawaii’s Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, Hualãlai, and Haleakalã volcanoes between 2000 and 2010. Images for all five areas were compiled and stacked to provide time series and temperature trends. Thermal areas were conspicuous on Kilauea, shown here, and Mauna Loa. The image on the right was produced by “œstacking” 42 individual surface kinetic temperature measurements of the Kilauea crater. The only significant change in thermal activity noted in the study period is the opening of the Halema”˜uma”˜u ventat Kïlauea’s summit in 2008. Researchers observed several small thermal anomalies that coincidewith pit craters on Hualälai. The anomalies most like  result from the sheltered nature of the depression, but closer inspection is warranted to determine if genuine thermal activity exists in the craters. Thermal areas were not detected on Haleakalä or Mauna Kea.

Patrick, M.R., and Witzke, C.-N., 2011, Thermal mapping of Hawaiian volcanoes with ASTER satellite data: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2011-5110, 22 p., available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5110/.

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