Image from TERRA
Thu, 07 Oct 2021 13:00 EDT

The U.S. Forest Service now has a powerful way to view near-real time fire detection from NASA satellite data that they can include in their hourly air quality forecasts.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 23 Sep 2021 14:53 EDT

New NASA research shows that by releasing heat and moisture through a large hole in sea ice known as a polynya, the exposed ocean fuels the formation of more clouds that trap heat in the atmosphere and hinder the refreezing of new sea ice.

Image from TERRA
Tue, 24 Aug 2021 13:05 EDT

Smoke from several large wildfires burning in Northern California can be seen traveling miles into the atmosphere.

Thermal mapping of Hawaiian volcanoes with ASTER data

An analysis of data from Terra’s Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument mapped the thermal characteristics of Hawaii’s Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, Hualãlai, and Haleakalã volcanoes between 2000 and 2010. Images for all five areas were compiled and stacked to provide time series and temperature trends. Thermal areas were conspicuous on Kilauea, shown here, and Mauna Loa. The image on the right was produced by “œstacking” 42 individual surface kinetic temperature measurements of the Kilauea crater. The only significant change in thermal activity noted in the study period is the opening of the Halema”˜uma”˜u ventat Kïlauea’s summit in 2008. Researchers observed several small thermal anomalies that coincidewith pit craters on Hualälai. The anomalies most like  result from the sheltered nature of the depression, but closer inspection is warranted to determine if genuine thermal activity exists in the craters. Thermal areas were not detected on Haleakalä or Mauna Kea.

Patrick, M.R., and Witzke, C.-N., 2011, Thermal mapping of Hawaiian volcanoes with ASTER satellite data: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2011-5110, 22 p., available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2011/5110/.

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