Image from TERRA
Mon, 08 Mar 2021 12:00 EST

Farmers, researchers, meteorologists and others now have access to high-resolution NASA data on soil moisture, thanks to a new tool developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) in collaboration with NASA and George Mason University.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 04 Feb 2021 10:00 EST

NASA satellite data helps people maintain thousands of freshwater pumps by highlighting places in Africa most at-risk for drought.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 05 Nov 2020 13:05 EST

Annapolis, Maryland; Norfolk, Virginia; and Miami were originally built and mapped to provide enough protection against flooding, but sea level rise has caused that buffer to shrink.

Data

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Terra’s five instruments produce 83 core data products which are distributed through the Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC), the Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC), Ocean Color Web, Level 1 and Atmosphere Archive and Distribution System, and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC).

Each data set is specialized and many work in concert with other data products.  To understand how remote sensing works many novice users may benefit from acquainting themselves with the Fundamentals of Remote Sensing, a resource from Natural Resource Canada.  Data sets are typically available as Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) files and there are a variety of HDF processing software available that allow users to display and browse images and data file information. Many of these software programs are available in the public domain as well as commercially.

The Terra data from each of the five instruments can be accessed through the respective data centers that host data products. These data centers are listed on each instrument data page.


Latest Terra data products information can be found on the following instrument data products page: