Image from TERRA
Thu, 05 Nov 2020 13:05 EST

Annapolis, Maryland; Norfolk, Virginia; and Miami were originally built and mapped to provide enough protection against flooding, but sea level rise has caused that buffer to shrink.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 22 Oct 2020 11:00 EDT

NASA scientists are combining data from water samples containing fish DNA with satellite data to find native fish and identify their habitats.

Image from TERRA
Fri, 25 Sep 2020 10:00 EDT

The August Complex Fire and others this fire season have been sending far-reaching plumes of wildfire smoke into the atmosphere that worsen air quality in California and beyond. Predicting where that smoke will travel and how bad the air will be downwind is a challenge, but Earth-observing satellites can help.

Mr. Robert Wolfe

Deputy Terra Project Scientist


Mail Code 614.5
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Greenbelt, MD 20771
USA


Phone: (301) 614-5508

Email: robert.e.wolfe at nasa.gov


Robert Wolfe is a computer scientist in the Terrestrial Information Systems Branch within the Hydrospheric and Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Wolfe has been involved in Earth remote sensing instruments, algorithms and data systems and since 1980 when he received a BS from Bridgewater College, VA. After a decade of developing government and commercial remote sensing projects, he began working with the MODIS instruments, algorithms and data system in the early 1990s. Robert’s current areas of interest are focused on accurate satellite geolocation and developing data systems and algorithms for retrieving terrestrial geophysical parameters. In 2004 he also became a NASA Science Team member for the joint NASA-NOAA-DOD mission (NPP/NPOESS) VIIRS instruments that are MODIS’s follow-on operational instrument series. In 2006 he took on the role of Terra Deputy Project Scientist for Data and then joined the MODIS science team in 2007. Wolfe has over 50 publications (book chapters and scientific, technical, and symposia papers) and is a member of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society and the American Geophysical Union.