Image from TERRA
Mon, 23 Mar 2020 09:20 EDT

Agricultural fires, most likely, cropping up in Cuba in March 2020.

Image from TERRA
Tue, 10 Mar 2020 16:51 EDT

A NASA study has found a link between climate change effects on the productivity of grasslands and the growing number of bison in Yellowstone National Park. The data, which came from two NASA Earth science satellites, shows daily vegetation growth for the past 20 years and can be used to help forecast the movements of bison, aiding conservation eff

Image from TERRA
Mon, 03 Feb 2020 10:23 EST

Australia has already been in a fiery situation for months so another fire starting in the Canberra region and spreading so quickly is nothing short of a tragedy for this country.

Mr. Robert Wolfe

Deputy Terra Project Scientist


Mail Code 614.5
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Greenbelt, MD 20771
USA


Phone: (301) 614-5508

Email: robert.e.wolfe at nasa.gov


Robert Wolfe is a computer scientist in the Terrestrial Information Systems Branch within the Hydrospheric and Biospheric Sciences Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Wolfe has been involved in Earth remote sensing instruments, algorithms and data systems and since 1980 when he received a BS from Bridgewater College, VA. After a decade of developing government and commercial remote sensing projects, he began working with the MODIS instruments, algorithms and data system in the early 1990s. Robert’s current areas of interest are focused on accurate satellite geolocation and developing data systems and algorithms for retrieving terrestrial geophysical parameters. In 2004 he also became a NASA Science Team member for the joint NASA-NOAA-DOD mission (NPP/NPOESS) VIIRS instruments that are MODIS’s follow-on operational instrument series. In 2006 he took on the role of Terra Deputy Project Scientist for Data and then joined the MODIS science team in 2007. Wolfe has over 50 publications (book chapters and scientific, technical, and symposia papers) and is a member of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society and the American Geophysical Union.