Image from TERRA
Thu, 06 May 2021 10:00 EDT

Valley fever is a dangerous threat to human health – and cases are on the rise in the arid southwestern United States, as wind from increasing dust storms can transport the fungal spores that cause the disease. Valley fever is caused by the Coccidioides fungus, which grows in dirt and fields and can cause fever, rash and coughing. Using NASA resear

Image from TERRA
Fri, 23 Apr 2021 11:00 EDT

In a decade filled by record-breaking events including raging wildfires, numerous hurricanes, unseasonal flooding and historically cold temperatures, NASA has continued to learn more about how the planet is changing and the effect it has on Earth’s systems.

Image from TERRA
Tue, 20 Apr 2021 10:49 EDT

Fertilizers used in farming contain high amounts of nutrients, such as phosphorous, to help crops grow. But these same nutrients can cause unwanted plant growth and potentially harm ecosystems miles away if agricultural runoff flows into nearby rivers, lakes, or coastal waters.

Dr. David J. Diner

MISR Principal Investigator

Jet Propulsion Laboratory
M/S 233-200
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena, CA 91109

Phone: 818-354-6319

Email: David.J.Diner@jpl.nasa.gov


Dr. David Diner is the principal investigator for the MISR instrument at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Diner joined JPL in 1981 as a member of the technical staff. He became the MISR principal investigator in 1989. In addition, he is currently principal investigator for the first and second generation Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imagers (AirMSPI, AirMSPI-2) and the Earth Venture Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA), which is currently in development for a planned 2022 launch. Diner is currently a senior research scientist at JPL with an interest in remote sensing instrument development; atmospheric optics; aerosol climate, environmental, and human health impacts; and planetary atmospheres.

Awards received include the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal for aerosol scientific leadership, the One NASA Peer Award, the NASA Space Act Award, the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for MISR, several NASA group achievement awards, and the American Association for Aerosol Research Benjamin Liu Award for outstanding contributions to aerosol instrumentation and experimental techniques.

Diner has a Bachelor of Science degree in physics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and advanced degrees (Master of Science and Ph.D.) in planetary science and geology from the California Institute of Technology.