Image from TERRA
Tue, 01 Jun 2021 14:00 EDT

The 2021 Atlantic hurricane season starts today, June 1. At NASA, we’re developing new technology and missions to study storm formation and impacts, including ways to understand Earth as a system.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 06 May 2021 10:00 EDT

Valley fever is a dangerous threat to human health – and cases are on the rise in the arid southwestern United States, as wind from increasing dust storms can transport the fungal spores that cause the disease. Valley fever is caused by the Coccidioides fungus, which grows in dirt and fields and can cause fever, rash and coughing. Using NASA resear

Image from TERRA
Fri, 23 Apr 2021 11:00 EDT

In a decade filled by record-breaking events including raging wildfires, numerous hurricanes, unseasonal flooding and historically cold temperatures, NASA has continued to learn more about how the planet is changing and the effect it has on Earth’s systems.

Month: April 2021

“This tool provides information that will help people track droughts or floods, make plans for when to plant crops, and forecast agricultural yields.”

Farmers, researchers, meteorologists, and others now have access to high-resolution NASA data on soil moisture, thanks to a new tool developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), NASA and George Mason University.

The app, Crop Condition and Soil Moisture Analytics (Crop-CASMA), provides access to high-resolution data from NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument in an easy-to-use format. Soil moisture data are critical for professionals in the agriculture and natural resources sectors who use soil moisture in tandem with other data to plan crop planting, forecast yields, track droughts or floods, and improve weather forecasts.

Read the entire article at https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasa-data-powers-new-usda-soil-moisture-portal

An article from Earth Observatory shows MISR’s role in understanding plume height of the explosive eruptions from the Caribbean volcano that have flung ash and sulfate particles to the stratosphere.

“Explosions on April 10 were energetic enough that the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on NASA’s Terra satellite measured part of the plume at altitudes up to 20 kilometers (12 miles).”

Read the entire article: https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/148190/tracking-la-soufrieres-plume

What NASA EOSDIS Earth science datasets were released in March 2021? Find new MODIS Terra/Aqua LAI datasets at #LPDAAC. Read more from NASA Earth Data https://go.nasa.gov/3wAhwPO