Image from TERRA
Thu, 07 Oct 2021 13:00 EDT

The U.S. Forest Service now has a powerful way to view near-real time fire detection from NASA satellite data that they can include in their hourly air quality forecasts.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 23 Sep 2021 14:53 EDT

New NASA research shows that by releasing heat and moisture through a large hole in sea ice known as a polynya, the exposed ocean fuels the formation of more clouds that trap heat in the atmosphere and hinder the refreezing of new sea ice.

Image from TERRA
Tue, 24 Aug 2021 13:05 EDT

Smoke from several large wildfires burning in Northern California can be seen traveling miles into the atmosphere.

2015 Wildfires in Alaska

alaska_amo_2015244Alaska is experiencing it’s second most severe fire season since 1950 with over 5.2 million acres burned (the average is 800,000 acres per year).

Terra and Aqua Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are useful for scientists and land managers to be able to monitor and asses the environmental impact of remote forest fires.  This allows groups like the scientists from Universtity of California, Irvine, and Woods Hole Research Center to publish and analysis of carbon emissions for Alaska’s boreal forests. In addition land managing agencies are able to monitor fires unpopulated areas and allow them to burn, freeing up limited resources to be used in highly populated areas.

 

Read more on NASA’s Earth Observatory

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