Category: News and Events

News and Events

MISR Where on Earth…?

Are you ready for a challenge? Become a geographical detective and solve the latest mystery quiz from NASA’s MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) instrument onboard the Terra satellite. Prize submissions for perfect scores accepted until Wednesday, August 8, at 4:00 p.m. PDT. Happy sleuthing!

Take the quiz here: http://climate.nasa.gov/quizzes/misr_quiz_30

September 2018 CERES Science Team Meeting

CERES will be hosting the 29th annual CERES Science Team Meeting jointly with GERB and ScaRaB from September 10 – 13 at NCAR in Boulder, Colorado. The meeting will showcase scientific findings and plans for the studying Earth’s radiation and energy from space.

October 2018 VIIRS/MODIS Science Team Meeting

The upcoming combined MODIS/VIIRS Science Team Meeting will be held October 15-19, 2018 at the Sheraton Silver Spring Hotel, 8777 Georgia Avenue, Silver Spring, MD  20910.  Accomplishments and plans for the future of MODIS and VIIRS will be discussed and shared. More information can be found on the MODIS Science Team Meeting website: https://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov/sci_team/meetings/201810/

The registration URL is available on-line at url: https://www.regonline.com/MODIS2018.  Everyone is urged to complete registration by October 10th so that proper planning for attendance and logistics can be achieved. Indicate by clicking on the appropriate box(es) which portions of the meeting you are planning on attending.  Agendas can also be accessed from the website once available.

15 years of MISR data show air pollution controls working in Southern California

New evidence shows that California’s clean air programs that reduce particle pollution in California are working.

Scientists from Emory University, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the California Air Resources Board analyzed the 15-year trend of fine particle pollution based on satellite data from Terra’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument. This type of pollution, known as PM2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in diameter) accounts for the greatest percentage of health impacts attributable to air pollution in California.

The study was recently published in the journal “Atmospheric Environment” is the first to evaluate long-term changes in major PM2.5 components using spatially comprehensive satellite data, according the the California Air Resources Board.

Read the press release from the California Air Resources Board.

MISR Views Kilauea

 

On May 6, 2018 as Kilauea continued to erupt, MISR passed overhead at approximately 11 a.m. local time, capturing this view of the island. While much of the island is covered by clouds, the eruption plume is visible streaming southwest over the ocean starting at the fissure on Hawaii’s eastern point. MISR uses it’s unique, nine-angle view to calculate plume height. This image is from one of MISR’s forward pointing cameras. The plume height is relatively low, meaning that gas and ash are staying near the ground, potentially causing health risks from poor air quality downwind.

Read more:

 

Ash from Kilauea Eruption Viewed by NASA’s MISR on NASA JPL’s Photojournal