Image from TERRA
Wed, 28 Nov 2018 13:49 EST

Central Africa is still on fire a month after the October 30 image of the fire was posted. Most likely these fires are agricultural in nature.

Image from TERRA
Tue, 27 Nov 2018 10:47 EST

Just like the Woolsey Fire's scar which was highlighted on the NASA Fire page on November 16, the Camp Fire scar is visible from space in this image taken by the Terra satellite on November 26, 2018.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 15 Nov 2018 11:55 EST

In the wake of a fire, a burn scar appears which takes a long time to heal. This scar is from the Woolsey fire which has taken its toll around Thousand Oaks, California.

Year: 2013

NASA’s REEL Science Communication Contest: High School Video and Animation Contest

NASA Earth Science missions are kicking off a new video contest engaging high school age students to produce a video communicating NASA Earth Science to younger students. Students are consuming over 10 hours of media a day and video is increasingly important to communicate and inform about science. NASA is looking for talented High School students to create videos that engage students in Earth Science.

Winners will have their videos posted on NASA’s website. They will also get the opportunity to be a NASA Producer working with NASA scientists and communication experts in July 2014 to produce an Earth Science feature video.

Find out more

Flash Floods in Central Texas

NASA images courtesy LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Holli Riebeek.

A large storm system brought more than a foot of rain to parts of Central Texas on October 30 and 31, 2013. Up to 14 inches (36 cm) of rain fell in the Austin region, according to the National Weather Service. The rain triggered flash floods that left two people dead, forced evacuations, and closed roads. The clouds had largely cleared by 12:35 p.m. when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite acquired the top natural color image. Normally black or dark blue, rivers and reservoirs are muddy brown and green from runoff. Read more

NASA images courtesy LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Holli Riebeek.

High Clouds Over South America

NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Holli Riebeek with interpretation by Kerry Meyer.

The view shown in this image is rare: a high bank of cirrus clouds sweeps east from the Andes Mountains of South America in otherwise clear skies. Under normal circumstances, other clouds would dominate the scene.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired the image on September 20, 2013, when strong upper level winds were blowing east across South America. Read more

NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Holli Riebeek with interpretation by Kerry Meyer.

Image of Hurricane Raymond featured on Livescience.com

Livescience.com recently featured a Terra MODIS image of Tropical Storm Raymond off of Mexico’s Pacific coast before it erupted into a major hurricane.

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Star Dunes in Algeria

NASA image courtesy NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Adam Voiland.

In some areas, winds tend to blow in roughly the same general direction all year. The Grand Erg Oriental, a sprawling sea of sand dunes in the Saharan Desert, is not one of them.

The winds in northeastern Algeria tend to be complex and changing. Easterly summer winds shift in the winter, becoming westerly. Meanwhile, passing storms and local geographical features further muddle the picture. If winds came consistently from one direction, crescent-shaped barchan dunes would reign. But the dominant dune type along the southern edge of Grand Erg Oriental (shown above) are large, pyramid-shaped star dunes, which only form in areas where winds blow from multiple directions.

The image was acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite on October 27, 2012. Read more

NASA image courtesy NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Adam Voiland.