Image from TERRA
Wed, 15 Jun 2022 11:00 EDT

A NASA-supported research program brings together goat herders, the luxury fashion industry, a gold mining company and Stanford University to use Earth observations to support more sustainable grazing practices.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 30 Dec 2021 13:00 EST

In 2021, Hurricane Ida left over 1 million people without power, tornadoes tore across the American Midwest, volcanoes forced people to evacuate their homes, wildfires covered the American West and unusual flooding wreaked havoc on Central Europe.

Image from TERRA
Thu, 21 Oct 2021 10:00 EDT

Instruments, like this flux tower, are used by scientists to verify the accuracy of the data available in OpenET, a powerful new web-based platform that puts Earth science data about water use by crops and other vegetation into the hands of farmers and water managers.

Tools and Data Quick Reference

Supplies for Backyard Research

  • Rain Gauge: CoCoRaHS Website has a list of suppliers, approximately $20-25
  • Wooden 4″ X 4″ Post with a beveled top for mounting gauge
  • Tools for placing the post into the ground such as a shovel, drill,screwdriver, hammer, nails/screws and level to attach gauge to post.
  • Detailed map of your location
  • Google Earth (to identify the latitude and longitude of your testsite)
  • Data sampling sheet, available in the Tools section of this guide and from idoscience.net, where you can share your observations withother citizen scientists.

Additional background information on the tools used can be found on the CoCoRaHS, rainlog.org and GLOBE websites.

Data and Tools for Earth Observation

  • Giovanni
    TRMM Online Visualization and Analysis System.

    • Giovanni
      is a Web-based application developed by the GES DISC that provides a simple and intuitive way to visualize, analyze, and access vast amounts of Earth science remote sensing data without having to download the data.
  • Google Earth
  • Additional exploration of satellite data can be done in NEO or NASA Earth Observations. NEO was designed to provide access to and simple analysis of satellite imagery in uniform, familiar data formats. NEO is for educators and students, citizen scientists, and informal educators like museums.