Image from TERRA
Wed, 10 Oct 2018 13:03 EDT

More than 400 miles above Earth, a satellite the size of a school bus is earning its frequent flyer miles. On Oct. 6, NASA’s Terra completed 100,000 orbits around Earth. Terra, which launched Dec. 18, 1999, is projected to continue operation into the 2020s.

Image from TERRA
Fri, 14 Sep 2018 01:33 EDT

NASA's MISR instrument captures Hurricane Florence just off the East Coast. Data from two of its nine cameras is combined to show the storm in 3D

Image from TERRA
Mon, 27 Aug 2018 16:33 EDT

For the first time ever, measurements from NASA Earth-observing research satellites are being used to help combat a potential outbreak of life-threatening cholera. Humanitarian teams in Yemen are targeting areas identified by a NASA-supported project that precisely forecasts high-risk regions based on environmental conditions observed from space.

Dr. Michael D. King

Michael King (500x500)MODIS Team Leader 

University of Colorado
Boulder, CO 80303-7814
USA
Phone: (303) 492-8099
Email: michael.king at lasp.colorado.edu


Dr. Michael King is Senior Research Associate in the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado. He previously served as Senior Project Scientist of NASA’s Earth Observing System (EOS) from 1992 to 2008. He joined Goddard Space Flight Center in January 1978 as a physical scientist, and served as Project Scientist of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) from 1983-1992. His research experience includes conceiving, developing, and operating multispectral scanning radiometers from a number of aircraft platforms in field experiments ranging from arctic stratus clouds to smoke from the Kuwait oil fires and biomass burning in Brazil and southern Africa. He has also developed inversion algorithms for deriving aerosol size distribution and refractive index from ground-based sunphotometers used worldwide. Earlier, he developed the Cloud Absorption Radiometer for studying the absorption properties of optically thick clouds as well as the bidirectional reflectance properties of many natural surfaces, and is principal investigator of the MODIS Airborne Simulator, an imaging spectrometer that flies onboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. This instrument has aided immeasurably in the development of atmospheric and land remote sensing algorithms for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument.

As a MODIS Science Team member, he also led the development of 5 science algorithms being run routinely to process MODIS data, including the algorithm for determining cloud optical thickness and effective particle radius of both liquid water and ice clouds, and gridded global atmosphere properties at 1° × 1° latitude/longitude resolution.

Dr. King has received many awards and recognitions for his research and leadership in Earth system science, including election to the National Academy of Engineering, election as a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He is also a recipient of the Verner E. Suomi Award of the AMS and the Space Systems Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and many NASA medals and awards.